Hello there,

August is a big month, and you may have already noticed us being a little bit more vocal on our website and across our social media pages…

That’s because it’s “Hearing Health Awareness Month”!

So, what’s the fuss about? And why is it such a significant month to raise awareness?

In recent times, we’ve learned that face masks and hearing loss are not a very good combination.

The inability to lip read or use facial cues due to the masks has caused many people to struggle when out and about, leaving them wondering what to do next.

“Hearing Health Awareness Month” aims to help educate and inspire our community to take the first step to better hearing.

Now Is The Perfect Time to Help

Since we’re raising the flag for hearing awareness this month, why not take part and speak to your loved one, family member, friend, or colleague to book their initial hearing assessment?

Now is the perfect time for them to begin their better-hearing journey.

The team is also looking for people to share their hearing loss stories with the world. 

This is your chance to encourage members of our community to make the right decision through your inspiring words. If you can help, please reply to this email, and we’ll send you further information.

Your help is much appreciated.

Updates from the Office

For your safety and convenience, our patient intake form is now available on our website. By completing this prior to your appointment, this will save you time when you visit us.

If you prefer not to see us in the office, our curbside service is still available for clean & checks, hearing aid repairs, accessory pickups, and access to essential supplies.

Alternatively, if you have a concern or hearing issue you wish to discuss, our Sound Hearing Cloud links you to an audiologist for a face-to-face video call.

5 Top Tips for Managing New Challenges

The pandemic has certainly brought new challenges to the community – especially if you have a hearing loss.

So our team has put together their five “top tips” for thriving in these new normal circumstances.

1. Face masks can easily send your hearing aids flying! A handy “find my device” app can help you to find your hearing aids when they’ve gone astray.

2. Invest in a state-of-the-art “streamer” if television time turns into television volume argument time in your family. A streamer will send sound directly to your hearing device so that you can hear every word, and no one will lose the plot! Ask us for more information.

3. Wear your hearing aids every day – even when you’re alone. This will keep your hearing active. Otherwise, it could worsen if sounds don’t regularly pass through your ears.

4. Clear face masks are a must-have for everyone with a hearing loss. If you’d like some supplies for daily use, let us know!

5. Take charge of your batteries and ensure you have enough to keep your devices functioning for at least eight weeks. If you are limiting your time outside of the home, you can replenish your supplies online, ask your pharmacy or supermarket to deliver some to you, or contact us for assistance.

Patient Resources

HOW FACE MASKS ARE AFFECTING PEOPLE WITH A HEARING LOSS

We take a look at some of the challenges you or your loved ones might face when trying to communicate with someone wearing a face mask…

Learn More…

CAN YOU PREVENT YOUR HEARING LOSS FROM GETTING WORSE?

As a part of our commitment to better hearing health, we have included some helpful advice to help prevent your hearing loss from getting worse…

Learn More…

Have a question or need help? Then we’re here for you.

Call us at:
Kennewick: (509) 572-2444
Walla Walla: (509) 876-0555
Prosser: (509) 786-5599

Have a great August!

The Team at Sound Audiology & Hearing Aids

Do you know somebody that needs to see this? Why not share it?

Lori Losey Lovato MA, FAAA, Audiologist

Lori Losey Lovato MA, FAAA, Audiologist

Lori attended Washington State University where she received a bachelor’s degree in speech and hearing sciences and her master’s degree in audiology. She began practicing audiology in the Tri-Cities in 1993 and has worked with both adult and pediatric patients. She has spent her career focused on assisting those with hearing difficulties through the use of hearing aids, listening strategies, assistive devices, and counseling.